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Question: TomTom One update using Linux


JohnnyC Author

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Apprentice Traveler
Replies: 0

6 April 2011, 03:44

I can't download HOME with Linux or either it isn't compatible with the Linux OS. How can I get a map update with my OS?

  • dhn
    dhn

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    Exalted Vanguard
    Replies: 14192
    Expert (Car navigation)

    Expert (Car navigation)

    6 April 2011, 03:54

    I know nothing about Linux, sorry.

     

    But I thought you could get a pc emulator to run within linux???

     

    If so, that's what you need since TT has no Home application that runs on linux at this time.

  • moz1959

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    Prominent Wayfarer
    Replies: 41

    28 April 2011, 14:24

     


    dhn wrote:

    I know nothing about Linux, sorry.

     

    But I thought you could get a pc emulator to run within Linux???

     

    If so, that's what you need since TT has no Home application that runs on Linux at this time.


     

    PC emulations are not a workable answer, as the TomTom Home software wants access

    to the windows drivers, which in turn rely upon Microsoft libraries. In particular, it's access to the USB ports that is the main issue. Linux sees the TomTom as a device, but its idea of the device differ from what TomTom Home needs to see. Therefore the device cannot be detected by TomTom Home, even if you manage to convince the Microsoft library DLLs to function.

     

    The real problem however is TomTom's total disinterest in supporting the Linux community.

     

    When asked point-blank about a TomTom Home for Linux, the response is invariably along the lines of:

     

    "Thank you for your feedback regarding our Linux Support. I'm sorry you're so disappointed, currently we have not made our software compatible with this operating system.

    At TomTom we take all customer comments, feedback and suggestions seriously and therefore we have passed your comments on to our 2nd Line Team, Product Management and Marketing Team.

    With Kind Regards

    The TomTom Customer Care Team"

     

    Of course, nothing further is ever heard of the request, as the above message seems to be a pseudonym for the black hole at the bottom of the bit bucket.

     

    My PCs all run on Linux and will never have Windows installed because I refuse to accept Microsoft's draconian licensing.

     

    Microsoft Windows is not the answer. Microsoft Windows is the question. No is the answer!

     

    As long as TomTom refuses to provide a means of downloading and installing maps on my TomTom Rider2 in a purely Linux environment, I will vote with my wallet and refuse to purchase any further TomTom products or services.

     

    Maybe Hell will freeze over and TomTom will get the message!

     

    Moz1959

  • eugenefinley

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    Master Explorer
    Replies: 6

    18 July 2011, 18:01

    Interesting to note that despite n support for linux, Tomtom runs on linux

     

     

  • skiddly

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    Master Traveler
    Replies: 2

    19 July 2011, 20:37

    hi moz what version of linux do you use i have ubuntu on netbook and have tried mint and jolicloud but is there any better, like you i find the tomtom isnt supported hence one reason i still have windows on main pc till that day arrives, skiddly

  • eugenefinley

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    Master Explorer
    Replies: 6

    19 July 2011, 23:11

    I can't believe the "support staff" at tomtom are replying to my emails with such stuff. Tomtoms run on linux but the people who answer these inquiries have no idea what it is and try to tell you to use work arounds that don't work. The problem is that their wondows softwaare doesn't work and they do not know how to fix it.

    I suggest again that Tom Tom put on thier (curently dysfunctional) web site the version of their software that came with the various models(that most of us did not back up). Let us have back what we had. Keep your updates and maps sales for those stupid enough to use your web site for updates.  This would solve the problems of most people complaining about the junk that is there now.

    I have read enough posts to know that other than replacing the units, there is no fix for their bugs, or people would be saying "hey they fixed it," but no one is saying that. This has gone on for months and will unless fixed destroy tomtom which was once good or we wouldn't have bought them. 

    Forget your profit model and fix this, or you won't have any moe profit or sales as your  reputation changes in the public eye to a disaster.

  • Mr-Mind

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    Apprentice Traveler
    Replies: 1

    28 April 2012, 02:17

    Well, until they get their heads out.....  I have an old version of XP that I guess that I will have to run in Virtual Box.....

  • moz1959

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    Prominent Wayfarer
    Replies: 41

    28 April 2012, 19:46


    skiddly wrote:

    hi moz what version of linux do you use i have ubuntu on netbook and have tried mint and jolicloud but is there any better, like you i find the tomtom isnt supported hence one reason i still have windows on main pc till that day arrives, skiddly


    Me, I've been a Unix admin since the mid 1980's, and have never owned a laptop, netbook or fondleslab.

    As a result, my concept of "better" probably wouldn't match your own.

     

    The way things stand, linux has the problem that certain hardware drivers and media codecs are either proprietary or patent encumbered. This means that linux distributions can't ship them as built-in features without either breaking the GPL license, which does not allow you to place further licensing restrictions on GPL licensed code, or paying licensing fees for these codecs and signing all sorts of non-disclosure agreements. Neither option is viable when you are giving away the software for free, as is the case with linux distributions that must comply to the GPL license for a large percentage of the code they distribute.

     

    Personally, I have a machines running Scientific linux, Centos, Fedora  and Kubuntu. I have at times also used Debian. which is the root source from which *ubuntu and Mint are derived. Debian has the advantage that you can for most intents and purposes keep updating from previous releases without needing to start again from scratch as new versions come about. It has the disadvantage that it  to a degree shuns anything that falls outside the Debian Social Contact (Everything must be available under a compatible FOSS license, preferably GPL.)

     

    Personally, I use computers as a tool, and don't particularly like the way many modern distros are trying to replace familiar and comfortable interfaces with "All new and improved user experience (now with 57% extra bling!) " which take up ever increasing pieces of screen real estate to make them tablet friendly. Ubuntu is one such distro with it's all new Unity interface, though gnome seems almost as determined to alienate its adherants.

     

    I like my interface to be fairly lean, efficient and fast without getting in my face. I like to work at the command line for that very reason. (As an example, I HATE the Microsoft "Ribbon" interface as it won't let me tailor it to suit my preferences. showing just the tools I regularly use instead of burying them in arcane lications in one of it's plethora of tabs.)

    For me, the interface configuration is always something over which I want to have complete control. Many modern interfaces seem determined to limit their users into an interface that their artistic design team thinks we need rather than allowing the user the freedom to mak their own choices.

     

    So for servers that I want to keep running over a long period with minimal disruption, I would use Debian because I can keep updating it until the cows come home. Comfort wise, I prefer Fedora for personal use (where I like to keep closer to the bleeding edge) because I am comfortable with the RPM packaging layout. (Debian packages can sometimes be over managed, splitting a package into too many seperate components, while RPM packages are more often happy to leave the identical programs in a single piece. (Apache is a good example, where Debian splits it into many components, splitting the SSL (https) features away from the main package.)

     

     

  • cassidy

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    Apprentice Traveler
    Replies: 1

    25 May 2012, 06:11

    i have this problem because my operating system is linux as well.. did you find a fix? should i send mine back to tomtom? i've had it a while though but even so they should cater for it.

  • Sidders

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    Neophyte Traveler
    Replies: 3

    4 August 2012, 13:08

    TomTom is a very shortsighted company. It started off well but hasn't had any new ideas.

    After I bought the GO700 I asked them if they had any plans for an aviation database, the answer was no, so I have a TomTom for the road and a Lowrance for flying.

    Meanwhile I have an Android phone with 3D streetview and reluctant as I am to buy anything from Apple, their iPhone and iPad supports road and aviation databases as well as flight planning software and TomTom is stuck at same old, same old.

  • eugenefinley

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    Master Explorer
    Replies: 6

    4 August 2012, 14:21

    There are two solid ways to run win on linux machines. Virtual box runs well and will run almost all windows software. A few win't accept the virtualness. There is also wine which works quite well. It seems who ever designed the original tomtom was a linux person since it is the perating system of tomtom. However the people there now do not understand linux or what they are doing or we would not have all these problems associated with the lack of computer knowledge on the part of customer support staff.

          At first I thougt it was only my problem, but I can see it is huge and worldwide and has been goingon for a long time. Probably ever since they fired whoever did the original gps software on which the thing is based. It works well, but all the "improvements and updates" are buggy and nearly non functional. Usually these are the signs that despite a great reputation, this company is headed straight to the junk pile fast. I am sure they have all the right credentials, but clearly they know nothing.

  • triviacompanion

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    Master Traveler
    Replies: 3

    13 September 2012, 23:13

    The problem is primarily related to the way maps are transferred across the wire.

    TomTom doesn't supply them in a format that linux can use, it's a closed protocol-ish thing.

     

    The solution is to get TomTom to deliver the maps as plain old files instead of proprietary format. If they supplied them as files that, say, wget or curl could use, it wouldn't be that difficult for the open source community to write software for linux. (you could probably even do it in shell... but I wouldn't recommend it)

    This REALLY shouldn't be that big a deal for them! all they'd need to do is provide a web interface (with an account password) that transfers the maps as regular files... or.. if they insist, using rsync.

    If anything, it'd be easier than windows... because they wouldn't have to do anything.


  • Gashog

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    Apprentice Traveler
    Replies: 2

    18 November 2012, 22:30

    I did some reading about this. Apparently, TomTom got in trouble with both the Linux community and Microsoft over licencing problems.

    Linux is licenced under the GNU GPL, which means that, since the original TomTom OS was Linux, it was supposed to be open source. TomTom was ordered in court to make a big cash donation to some hacker group, and to publish the TomTom proprietary source code. I bet that was irritating!

     

    Microsoft singled out TomTom for a FAT16 copywright infringement of some sort. Very strange.

     

    Anyway, I think we can forget about TomTom giving Linux users even the time of day. That whole mess must have left a very bad taste.

     

  • Sidders

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    Neophyte Traveler
    Replies: 3

    19 November 2012, 00:19

    I knew about MS and the FAT problem.

    As far as the GPL is concerned the source code must be available to any purchaser.

     

    I think the GPL will allow undisclosed proprietary extensions for a fee.

     

    I did once attach the TomTom as USB storage and backed up the code but a restore changed uppercase letters to lowercase, that was several years ago.

     

    I see there is now an Android app and it shouldn't be that difficult to provide a Linux update to the TomTom mounted as USB storage.

  • Gashog

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    Apprentice Traveler
    Replies: 2

    19 November 2012, 06:34

    The GPL'ed source code used in TomTom GO falls into a number of categories:

    The compiler toolchain used to build all the software.
    The Linux kernel for ARM, with modifications by TomTom.
    BlueZ libraries and utilities (under GPL).
    Other third party software (under GPL or LGPL).
    TomTom software (under GPL or LGPL).

    A detailed description of these categories follows, including information on where to download this source code and/or its modifications.

    If you want to build your own software to run on the TomTom GO, RIDER or ONE devices, and need information or suggestions on how to do so, we suggest taking a look at the independent OpenTom project, on its website: http://www.opentom.org/.
    However, please note that TomTom has no control over the OpenTom project or its websites. Therefore TomTom does not officially support it, and takes no responsibility for any problems you might have using it.

     

  • mantis3dfx

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    Master Traveler
    Replies: 4

    31 May 2014, 15:17

    ...Just received an email from TomTom stating the following:

     

    (Partial extract)
    "...Our ambition is to help billions of drivers, like you, to get to your destinations faster, every day.   ..."

     

    IF their "Ambition" is to help billions of Drivers like me, then they would make their "Map Update" application available on all platforms - INCLUDING LINUX!

    ...It's really not to much to expect, considering their devices already benefit from using Linux firmware, that they "Give Something Back" in return, to the Linux community who made the software available to them in the first place!

    They're downright inconsiderate, rude and plain selfish, to be completely honest. 

    After previously enjoying TomTom devices for so long,  I can now no longer justify buying them, seeing as I can nolonger update the maps with ease.

    Why shoud I have to "Downgrade" my OS of choice, to something like Winblow$ or some "half eaten" fruit OS (who "ALSO" benefits largely from GPL software but gives nothing back that's useful in return!)

    In comparison to how much they spend on developing the app for other platforms, it would cost NOTHING really, to port it over to a basic linux binary, which the community could then furthr develop for deployment onto various Linux distro's.  ...Once again, the "Open Source" community would be doing all the hard yards for them - (As usual!)

  • mantis3dfx

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    Master Traveler
    Replies: 4

    31 May 2014, 15:23

    Kind of defeats the purpose though doesn't it. The whole idea for me was to "SAVE" HDD space, by removing MS's bloated OS completely. Linux runs faster, takes less space, and with the exception of iTunes and TomTom home, runs EVERYTHING else I need painlessly and without problems.

    I solved the iTunes problem,  ...dumped apple and went android phone.

    NOW it looks like it's time to DUMP TomTom devices, and get a different brand GPS!

  • Sidders

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    Neophyte Traveler
    Replies: 3

    31 May 2014, 16:15

    If you hook a TomTom up to a Linux box it is detected as USB storage and you can do a backup. Restore is a problem because everything goes to the TomTom arrives as lowercase and the device fails to work with it.

     

    Microsoft's support for USB is poor and other projects such as Software Defined Radio have to use the open source libusb0.dll.

     

    High Speed sound devices are restricted as Microsoft only implements UAC1 (USB Audio Class 1) and not the modern UAC2 which has been around for years. Users of those high speed audio cards have to obtain a driver from the maunfacturer under a NDA license and pay ~$1000.00 for the privilige.

     

    All embedded ARM processor boards use SD cards with one partition as FAT16/FAT32 and the other partitions are Linux EXT4 and swap - no difficulty there.

     

    I don't see any insurmountable difficulty, after all it's all about transferring a blob of data to a device.

     

    In one case when rebuilding a laptop for a relative the Ethernet driver was missing which meant I couldn't get online to install it. I downloaded it to Linux, copied it to a USB stick and installed it on the Windows laptop.

     

    Supplied as a blob, there must be a way to wite it to USB storage (The TomTom).

     

     

     

  • Powderking

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    Apprentice Traveler
    Replies: 1

    3 June 2015, 12:16

    I had the same problem some years ago and have recently bought a Rider, so I have the same problem now.

    If TomTom were honest, they would include a Windows License with their product because the devices' functional range is limited without a proprietary operating system.

    One should think until now it would be possible to use standard libraries to make a browser copy some files to the devices which updates itself with these files.

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